Master's degree

country
province
city
subject area 
language 
kind of studies  
university type - Poland  
university status  
Warsaw, Poland

Criminal Justice

Master's
Field of studies: Sociology
Language: EnglishStudies in English
Subject area: social
Kind of studies: full-time studies
University website: www.civitas.edu.pl/en/
The course is designed to enhance your career prospects in roles linked to criminal justice institutions such as the police, courts, prosecution, probation, prison service, as well as social services and non-governmental organizations. The course will also suit those who consider a career in international law enforcement co-operation.
Criminal Justice
Criminal justice is the delivery of justice to those who having committed crimes. The criminal justice system is a series of government agencies and institutions whose goal is to identify and catch the law-breakers and to inflict a form of punishment on them. Other goals include the rehabilitation of offenders, preventing other crimes, and moral support for victims. The primary institutions of the criminal justice system are the police, prosecution and defense lawyers, the courts and prisons.
Justice
Justice is the legal or philosophical theory by which fairness is administered. The concept of justice differs in every culture. An early theory of justice was set out by the Ancient Greek philosopher Plato in his work The Republic. Advocates of divine command theory say that justice issues from God. In the 17th century, theorists like John Locke advocated natural rights as a derivative of justice. Thinkers in the social contract tradition state that justice is derived from the mutual agreement of everyone concerned. In the 19th century, utilitarian thinkers including John Stuart Mill said that justice is what has the best consequences. Theories of distributive justice concern what is distributed, between whom they are to be distributed, and what is the proper distribution. Egalitarians state that justice can only exist within the coordinates of equality. John Rawls used a theory of social contract to show that justice, and especially distributive justice, is a form of fairness. Property rights theorists (like Robert Nozick) take a deontological view of distributive justice and state that property rights-based justice maximizes the overall wealth of an economic system. Theories of retributive justice are concerned with punishment for wrongdoing. Restorative justice (also sometimes called "reparative justice") is an approach to justice that focuses on restoring what is good, and necessarily focuses on the needs of victims and offenders.
Justice
Justice, under capitalism, works not from a notion of obedience to moral law, or to conscience, or to compassion, but from the assumption of a duty to preserve a social order and the legal “rights” that constitute that order, especially the right to property. … It comes to this: that decision will seem most just which preserves the system of justice even if the system is itself routinely unjust.
Curtis White, “The spirit of disobedience: An invitation to resistance,” Harper’s, April 2006, p. 32.
Justice
There can be no justice so long as laws are absolute. Even life itself is an exercise in exceptions.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard in "Justice" (9 November 1987) by Worley Thorne and Ralph Wills
Justice
Law and justice are not always the same. When they aren't, destroying the law may be the first step toward changing it.
Gloria Steinem, Open Secrets : Ninety-four Women in Touch with Our Time (1972) by Barbaralee Diamonstein.

Contact:

Palace of Culture and Science
12th floor
Plac Defilad 1
00-901 Warsaw
tel. (48 22) 656 71 87/89
fax: (48 22) 656 71 75
Privacy Policy