Master's degree

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Olsztyn, Poland

Production Management

Zarządzanie produkcją

Master's
Field of studies: Agriculture
Language: PolishStudies in Polish
Subject area: agriculture, forestry and fishery, veterinary
Kind of studies: full-time studies, part-time studies
University website: www.uwm.edu.pl/en/
Management
Management (or managing) is the administration of an organization, whether it is a business, a not-for-profit organization, or government body. Management includes the activities of setting the strategy of an organization and coordinating the efforts of its employees (or of volunteers) to accomplish its objectives through the application of available resources, such as financial, natural, technological, and human resources. The term "management" may also refer to those people who manage an organization.
Production
Production may be:
Management
Management is defined here as the accomplishment of desired objectives by establishing an environment favorable to performance by people operating in organized groups. Each of the managerial functions (planning, organizing, staffing, , directing, and controlling) is analyzed and described in a systematic way. As this is done, both the distilled experience of practicing managers and the findings of scholars are presented. This is approached in such a way that the reader may grasp the relationships between each of the functions, obtain a clear view of the major principles underlying them.
Harold Koontz and Cyril O'Donnell. Principles of Management; An Analysis of Managerial Functions. 1968, p. 1
Management
In the long-run the workman may be as necessary to his master as his master is to him, but the necessity is not so immediate.
Adam Smith (1776) The Wealth of Nations Chapter VIII, p. 80
Production
To those who clamor, as many now do, "Produce! Produce!" one simple question may be addressed:—"Produce what?" ...What can be more childish than to urge the necessity that productive power should be increased, if part of the productive power which exists already is misapplied? Is not less production of futilities as important as, indeed a condition of, more production of things of moment? ... Yet this result of inequality ... cannot be prevented, or checked, or even recognized by a society which excludes the idea of purpose from its social arrangements and industrial activity.
R. H. Tawney, The Acquisitive Society (1920), p. 39.
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