country
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subject area 
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qualification - Germany
university type - Germany  
university status  
Bonn, Germany

Art Therapy

Kunsttherapie

Master's
Language: GermanStudies in German
Subject area: arts
Qualification: MA
Kind of studies: full-time studies
University website: www.alanus.edu
Art
Art is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power. In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art.
Art Therapy
Art therapy (also known as arts therapy) is a creative method of expression used as a therapeutic technique. Art therapy originated in the fields of art and psychotherapy and may vary in definition.
Therapy
Therapy (often abbreviated tx, Tx, or Tx) is the attempted remediation of a health problem, usually following a diagnosis. In the medical field, it is usually synonymous with treatment (also abbreviated tx or Tx). Among psychologists and other mental health professionals, including psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, counselors, and clinical social workers, the term may refer specifically to psychotherapy (sometimes dubbed 'talking therapy'). The English word therapy comes via Latin therapīa from Greek: θεραπεία and literally means "curing" or "healing".
Therapy
Rust Cohle: I’m the person least in the need of counseling in this entire fucking state.
True Detective (TV series) Haunted Houses, written by Nic Pizzolatto
Therapy
Things have to be done fast in America, and therefore therapy has to be brief.
Gregory Bateson, Communication: The Social Matrix of Psychiatry, 1951, p. 148 as cited in: C.H. Patterson (1958) "Two approaches to human relations". in: American Journal of Psychotherapy. Vol 7.
Art
Art hath an enemy called Ignorance.
Ben Jonson, Every Man out of His Humour (1598), Act I, scene 1.
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