Saint-Étienne, France

Biomedical Engineering

Master's
Language: EnglishStudies in English
Subject area: engineering and engineering trades
Qualification: M12
University website: www.mines-stetienne.fr/
Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical engineering (BME) is the application of engineering principles and design concepts to medicine and biology for healthcare purposes (e.g. diagnostic or therapeutic). This field seeks to close the gap between engineering and medicine, combining the design and problem solving skills of engineering with medical biological sciences to advance health care treatment, including diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy. Biomedical engineering has only recently emerged as its own study, as compared to many other engineering fields. Such an evolution is common as a new field transitions from being an interdisciplinary specialization among already-established fields, to being considered a field in itself. Much of the work in biomedical engineering consists of research and development, spanning a broad array of subfields (see below). Prominent biomedical engineering applications include the development of biocompatible prostheses, various diagnostic and therapeutic medical devices ranging from clinical equipment to micro-implants, common imaging equipment such as MRIs and EKG/ECGs, regenerative tissue growth, pharmaceutical drugs and therapeutic biologicals.
Engineering
Engineering is the creative application of science, mathematical methods, and empirical evidence to the innovation, design, construction, operation and maintenance of structures, machines, materials, devices, systems, processes, and organizations. The discipline of engineering encompasses a broad range of more specialized fields of engineering, each with a more specific emphasis on particular areas of applied mathematics, applied science, and types of application. See glossary of engineering.
Engineering
There are two laws discrete,
Not reconciled,—
Law for man, and law for thing;
The last builds town and fleet,
But it runs wild,
And doth the man unking.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ode, Inscribed to William H. Channing
Engineering
Architects and engineers are among the most fortunate of men since they build their own monuments with public consent, public approval and often public money.
John Prebble, in Disaster at Dundee, 1956. p. 16
Engineering
A man should build a house with his own hands before he calls himself an engineer.
Alexander Solzhenitsyn (1963), One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, p. 98
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