Vienna, Austria

Viticulture, Oenology and Wine Industry

Weinbau, Önologie und Weinwirtschaft

Master's
Language: GermanStudies in German
Subject area: agriculture, forestry and fishery, veterinary
Qualification: MSc
University website: www.boku.ac.at
Master of Science, MSc
4 Semester
120 ECTS
Industry
Industry is the production of goods or related services within an economy. The major source of revenue of a group or company is the indicator of its relevant industry. When a large group has multiple sources of revenue generation, it is considered to be working in different industries. Manufacturing industry became a key sector of production and labour in European and North American countries during the Industrial Revolution, upsetting previous mercantile and feudal economies. This came through many successive rapid advances in technology, such as the production of steel and coal.
Oenology
Oenology (enology; ee-NOL-o-jee) is the science and study of wine and winemaking; distinct from viticulture, the agricultural endeavours of vine-growing and of grape-harvesting. The English word oenology derives from the word oinos, "wine" (οἶνος) and the suffix –logia "study of" (-λογία) from the Ancient Greek language. An oenologist is an expert in the fields comprehended by the "Viticulture and Oenology" designation for oenology-training programmes and research centres that include schooling, training, and education in the outdoor and indoors aspects of wine and the making of wine.
Viticulture
Viticulture (from the Latin word for vine) is the science, production, and study of grapes. It deals with the series of events that occur in the vineyard. It is a branch of the science of horticulture.
Wine
Wine (from Latin vinum) is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes, generally Vitis vinifera, fermented without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients.
Industry
In the 1950s, industrial workers had become the largest single group in every developed country, and unionized industrial workers in mass-production industry (which was then dominant everywhere) had attained upper-middle-class income levels. They had extensive job security, pensions, long paid vacations, and comprehensive unemployment insurance or "lifetime employment." Above all, they had achieved political power... Thirty-five years later, in 1990, industrial workers and their unions were in retreat. They had become marginal in numbers. Whereas industrial workers who make or move things had accounted for two fifths of the American work force in the 1950s, they accounted for less than one fifth in the early 1990s--that is, for no more than they had accounted for in 1900, when their meteoric rise began... By the year 2000 or 2010, in every developed free-market country, industrial workers will account for no more than an eighth of the work force. Union power has been declining just as fast.
Peter Drucker, "The Age of Social Transformation." The Atlantic Monthly; Nov. 1994; Vol. 274, No. 5. p. 53-80.
Wine
Men to whom wine had brought death long before lay by springs of wine and drank still, too stupefied to know their lives were past.
Gene Wolfe, The Book of the New Sun, Vol II, Ch. 17: The Tale of the Student and his Son, Part 4.
Wine
In vino veritas.
In wine, truth.
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